Tag Archives: Stuart Allan

Journalism Technologies: 20. Did That Really Just Happen?

This week’s lecture in Journalism Technologies was listed in the module handbook at the start of term as being about UGC and verification, an important skill which journalists increasingly need when sorting fact from fiction on social media. But with the growing focus on fake news since then – a term which has had an extraordinary half-life, taking it from little-known buzzword to over-used cliche in a matter of months – I thought this was a good opportunity to explain to the studentsΒ that recent history.

For an academic concept to help illustrate these overlapping areas of fake news and UGC verification, I turned to a great book by my PhD supervisor Stuart Allan, Citizen Witnessing. Students are often familiar with the idea of ‘citizen journalism’, something often taught in A-Level media classes. Stuart’s book offers a nuanced evolution of that rather broad concept, and examines more closely those who record, post and share content when they find themselves caught up in dramatic news events.

A key difference from the ‘citizen journalists’ of Indymedia who came to prominence covering the Seattle protests of 1999 – who can arguably be described in turns as cousins of the sport and music fanzine writers of years gone by – is that citizen witnesses aren’t actively trying to do journalism as such. Β To me, the greater journalistic act takes place when a newsroom attempts to verify that material, before publishing it as part of a news report. So I agree that those witnesses are better not described as journalists of any kind. But regardless of the terminology, journalists are increasingly under pressure to do that verification, and quickly, and the emergence of a skills gap in this area within journalism has led to the outsourcing of that task to growing players such as Storyful.

Rather than getting all the students to take a look at Stuart’s book though, I decided to get them to read Guardian editor Kath Viner’s essay of last summer. Even though it was written largely before the Donald Trump-based rise of fake news, it’s still a good read, especially for an audience with little prior knowledge of this area. One interesting aspect of that: plenty of students were more than a bit surprised to discover the rather uncertain provenance of the infamous David Cameron/pig story.

I’ve Started My PhD

I'm a student again. So if you need 10% off in Topshop let me know.

I’m a student again. So if you need 10% off in Topshop let me know.

I was in Cardiff on Tuesday to formally start my PhD. I’ll be doing it part-time, while continuing to work full-time at the University of Huddersfield. I’ve got one research day a week to work on it, with a bit of extra time over the summer, and my target is to complete within five years.

I’m fortunate to have Huddersfield’s financial backing, so I’ve had quite a free hand with what to study. I’ve chosen something I’ve been interested in since my hyperlocal experiences with Saddleworth News, the coverage of courts and councils by local newspapers and other media. By focusing on some towns in the north of England, I aim to assess the current level of coverage, how that compares with the past and the extent to which it’s under pressure from cutbacks in the local press. I want to produce some practical recommendations which will hopefully help make sure proper coverage of local public affairs continues, even if certain newspapers are forced to print only weekly or not at all in future.

Cardiff University’s School of Journalism, Media and Cultural Studies is a natural home for my research, not least because it has a particular interest in community and hyperlocal media. Prof Stuart Allan will be my supervisor, with Prof Richard Sambrook as second supervisor. I’ll be updating this blog occasionally with bits and bobs from my studies as I go along.