Tag Archives: Scripps Howard Journalism Entrepreneurship Institute

Using Balsamiq In The Classroom

One of my final year students using Balsamiq.

One of the tools which I learned about during my recent visit to Arizona for the Scripps Howard Journalism Entrepreneurship Institute, was Balsamiq. It’s an online tool which allows you to create a mock-up – a wireframe – of what your planned website or app would look like. We used it when putting together our pitches, so we could give a flavour of what we were proposing without having to go through the actual process of knocking up even a basic version for real.

I found it easy to use, and so I’ve already incorporated it into my new final year module, Journalism Innovation. Students are working on their second and last assessment of the academic year, which is to work in groups to create a business plan for a proposed media start-up company. They’ve got formative pitches to do next month, and so I decided to use some class time both last week and this week, to get them doing a few Balsamiq wireframes, so they could include a couple in their pitch decks.

And it’s worked well. The software is easy to use and the students really took to it. Although it would be easy enough to get them to start websites for their projects (and many will anyway), it would be time-consuming, and also pointless if they’d rather do an app (which neither I nor they have the skills to create) or have an idea that lives on social platforms only. An added bonus: for the 30-day trial at least, it’s free. And for this sort of student project, the basic 30-day version is more than enough.

I’ve also made up a helpsheet, which can be downloaded here for anyone to use.

My Week At The Scripps Howard Journalism Entrepreneurship Institute 2017

It’s me.

So, I spent the first week of 2017 in Phoenix, Arizona, as a fellow of the Scripps Howard Journalism Entrepreneurship Institute. There were 15 of us taking part, with 12 lecturers drawn from around the US, one each from the UAE and Mexico, with me rounding out the group. We’re all either in the early stages of, or about to start, teaching a class in journalism and entrepreneurship, and the week was all about making connections, sharing best practice, and learning from thinkers and trendsetters in both education and journalism.

Prof Jeff Jarvis appeared via Skype.

The event was overseen by Prof Dan Gillmor, and he invited a range of excellent speakers to participate in person or via Skype. There was a particular focus on the role of verticals – that is, digital media companies focusing on a niche, rather than attempting to match the broad scope of the legacy organisations and some of the better-known pure players such as BuzzFeed.

The great man’s famous sign-off.

Steven Levy, veteran Silicon Valley journalist and now Editor of Backchannel, delivered a keynote address with the hopeful conclusion that high-quality reporting could just be the very thing that eventually sustains business models for more publishers. From a UK perspective, The Economist, the Financial Times and, to an extent, The Times have all demonstrated the possibility of this. But on the other hand, The Sun’s paywall was a failure. The Blendle model which has worked so well in Holland, has in its favour the fact that there is little global competition for Dutch language content.

Which arguably brings us back to verticals. One of the week’s most interesting sessions was courtesy of Rafat Ali, the one time founder of Paid Content, and now the person behind travel siteย Skift. For shame, I’d not heard of it, but it already employs more than 30 people, with a mixed revenue model consisting of paid-for insight reports and conferences, alongside a focus on more traditional forms of distributionย including e-mail newsletters. Doing things that others can’t or won’t do, and to a level that customers are prepared to pay for, was a key theme of this and other talks.

The Cronkite School, early on a mild winter morning.

The week finished with all of us having the chance to pitch our own ideas to Dan. One of the most useful aspects of that process was being introduced to Balsamiq, a tool which allows you to create wireframe mock-ups of apps and websites. I’ve already incorporated it into my teaching on the Journalism Innovation class here at Huddersfield, and students have found it a very helpful bit of software. The connections I made with all of the other fellows are due to continue over the next few weeks too, with a series of webinars hosted by Michelle Ferrier of Ohio University, so the benefits of the Institute didn’t stop when I left Phoenix.

All that’s left is for me to record my thanks to all of the fellows, the Scripps Howard Foundation for picking up the tab, the University of Huddersfield for my flights to the US, as well as Dan and Joanna Sanchez-Alvillar at the Cronkite School for all their hard work organising the week.

The Scripps Howard Journalism Entrepreneurship Institute 2017

The Walter Cronkite School of Journalism at ASU. (picture: Cygnusloop99/Wikipedia)

The Walter Cronkite School of Journalism at ASU. (picture: Cygnusloop99/Wikipedia)

I’ve been chosen to take part in next week’s Scripps Howard Journalism Entrepreneurship Institute, at Arizona State University’s Walter Cronkite School in Phoenix. Hooray!

All the details are here. There are 12 lecturers from around the US, plus representatives from Mexico and the UAE, and me.

Part of the deal is that attendees are obliged to either be about to begin, or to have just started, a course in journalism entrepreneurship. I started my final year Journalism Innovation module in September, and with 52 students it’s taken up a lot of my time so far this academic year. But it’s been great fun, and I’m hoping next week’s sessions will really help me along the way with it. I’m actually holding two hackdays with the students not long after I’m back, so it’s pretty timely.