Tag Archives: Instafax

News Rewired: February 2014

I was at Journalism.co.uk’s latest News Rewired conference in London last Thursday. As is often the case at these events, I learned a new word. This time it was ‘dronalism’ which I heard casually bandied around during a session on drones for news, as if it was an entirely normal thing to say.

Peter Bale from CNN demonstrated the above video of the wreck of the Costa Concordia, which they broadcast after buying it from Team BlackSheep. As cool as it undoubtedly is, I thought Bale was pleasingly candid when he said that drones would be all the rage in TV newsrooms for a while, but that things would die down when editors got tired of them and realised they only really add a dimension to certain stories.

Mobile in general was the key theme of much of the day, and several speakers mentioned the new benchmark being reported across leading news websites including BBC News – that visits from mobiles and tablets taken together have now overtaken those from desktops and laptops.

Matt Danzico of the BBC, and one of the brains behind its new Instafax service on Instagram, said it would be the template for Auntie’s offerings on all social media away from Facebook and Twitter. He pointed out that putting text on a short-form video is often a better solution for mobile than the traditional TV package mixture of clips and a voice over, because people like to watch these things in public and don’t want to send sound booming across the bus queue.

Amid all the well-received show-and-tells, the only real note of tension came whenever the issue of online copyright came up. The keynote speech from BuzzFeed’s ‘cat guy’ Jack Shepherd was smooth and mostly went down very well, the gif-based fun only draining away a touch when someone asked about whether they had the proper permissions for every single one of those images.

The same went for Hannah Waldram’s similarly enjoyable presentation on Instagram. Persistent questions from one freelancer about the company’s treatment of the metadata of the images uploaded to its app turned the mood in the room a bit sour. Waldram said that it was still an emerging debate, and someone called out: “Yes, and you’re right in the middle of it!” Only idiots go to media conferences and make predictions, so here’s mine: this is one talking point we’re going to be discussing a lot more.

There’s more information about News Rewired at its website.

Using Instagram Video In The Classroom

The new Instafax service from BBC News.

The new Instafax service from BBC News.

I was in Leeds yesterday, leading a practical session for some BTEC media and journalism students at the City College. I thought I’d give them an insight into something new they could expect to learn more about during any future university course they might do, so put together a one-hour workshop on smartphone video, using Instagram Video.

Launched last summer, Instagram’s video function allows users to stop-and-start their way to little 15 second clips that be easily shared. Its rival, Twitter’s Vine, lets you make six second videos which loop. This last point seems to give Vine the edge for creativity, but BBC News recently began experimenting with Instagram Video for a service it calls Instafax. They’re little mini-bulletins featuring some still images, a bit of text and background music, currently sent out about three or four times a day.

It’s too early to say whether others will seek to copy Instafax, but with 130 million active monthly users, Instagram appears to be too popular for media companies to ignore.

In yesterday’s session, after rattling through some of these points and explaining why smartphone video is another important piece of kit in the toolbox of the modern journalist, I gave the students ten minutes to make their own short clips on anything topical they liked.

I’d hoped to send them outside, but I turned out to be giving the session on the 11th floor, so I just got them to see what they could find in the corridors. One made one on the lift which wasn’t working, which seemed like a newsworthy enough story to me having walked up 11 flights of stairs! Getting the students to save the clips on a particular hashtag meant I could use one of the many Instagram desktop viewers to take the group through some of their work and give a bit of feedback.

The presentation I gave is here.