Tag Archives: Ed Walker

Journalism Technologies: 15. Trinity Mirror

Ed Walker and Lauren Ballinger giving this week’s lecture.

We had two guests with us this week for the latest lecture in Journalism Technologies at the University of Huddersfield: Ed Walker and Lauren Ballinger of Trinity Mirror. Following on from last week’s session on the changing nature of business models, in particular for legacy publishers, I thought it was a good idea to invite two of the journalists leading the way in developing the way TM does things in its many local newsrooms.

Ed is the head of Digital Publishing at Trinity Mirror Regionals, while Lauren has been Executive Editor of the Huddersfield Examiner since last year. They both gave excellent talks illustrating some of the things they’ve been working on recently: Lauren took students through the Examiner’s online coverage of last month’s M62 police shooting, which featured a five-day liveblog and a huge increase in online traffic for January. Ed stressed the importance of the range of skills needed for the modern media professional. In particular, he highlighted the focus Trinity Mirror is now putting on video: a new recruitment round taking the number of dedicated video staff in TM’s local newsrooms from three just over a year ago, to 60 in the near future.

In many cases they were repeating lessons I’ve been trying to get across to the students already, in particular about professional use of smartphones and social platforms: but I’ve got no doubt they had much more weight coming from Ed and Lauren! So thanks again to them both for coming in on a Monday morning and giving such interesting insights.

Talk About Local ’13

With it being the start of teaching, it’s taken me more than week to get around to blogging about this year’s Talk About Local get-together, which I went to in Middlesbrough at the end of last month.

This annual unconference for people interested in independent local media publishing and related issues has been running since 2009, and I’ve been at all but the first one. This year the event was notably smaller than 2012’s large one in Birmingham (probably a function of that city’s particularly developed hyperlocal sector), but the sessions were arguably more useful for having fewer people in them.

TAL’s Sarah Hartley has gathered together a list of other blogposts already written about the event here, so I’ll just add a couple of my own impressions.

It’s clear to me ‘hyperlocal’ is no longer the buzzword it was in, say, 2009, when I first had the idea to set up my own site in Saddleworth. This, and the fact the event was held in the relatively unusual location of Middlesbrough, probably accounted for the relative lack of presence from mainstream media companies at the event. Ed Walker of Trinity Mirror (and Blog Preston) was there, but nobody from TM’s local Middlesbrough Gazette turned up, despite having apparently been invited individually by TAL.

The view of Middlesbrough from the balcony of MIMA, where the event took place.

The view of Middlesbrough from the balcony of MIMA, where the event took place.

Perhaps some of the lessons of hyperlocal community reporting, as partly outlined in the book Ed recently co-authored, have now been absorbed by traditional media companies and therefore they’re no longer as interested in the sector. Whatever the reason, the mutual distrust between hyperlocal practitioners and newspaper executives, so much a feature of past events like this, was pleasingly almost absent this time.

Instead, the sessions I took part in were rather less about news, and much more about publishing other forms of community information. I was particularly taken with On The Wight’s oral history project, Voices, another string to the remarkable bow that Simon and Sally Perry have built up over the past eight years.

And perhaps it’s just because I’ve gone from mainstream journalist to hyperlocal journalist to academic, but I spotted that the university sector was notably well represented, not least because the Creative Citizens research project helped fund the day.

After the initial rush of interest in hyperlocal media, it seems the sector is now more reflective. But all the activity around the country, now being more thoroughly researched and analysed than ever before, demonstrates it’s not been a passing fad.

What I’m Reading: Connected: The Power Of Modern Community

Well worth £1.99.

Well worth £1.99.

I was very kindly sent a review copy of the new ebook from Guardian Shorts about online communities. Called Connected: The Power of Modern Community, it’s by the Guardian’s Hannah Waldram, Ed Walker of Trinity Mirror, and the Cardiff-based publisher and journalist Marc Thomas. And having read it over coffee in Huddersfield this lunchtime, here are some brief thoughts about it.

Cardiff’s a bit of a recurring theme here, because Hannah and Ed both worked there on Guardian Cardiff and Your Cardiff respectively. And the book kicks off with a great story from the city, about how a remarkable trove of old pictures was found and then shared both online and off, culminating in exhibitions and the tracing of the original photographer.

The blend of online and offline features throughout the book. In the conclusion, there’s a list of ten principles for managing an online community, the first of which is ‘get offline’. This excellent advice might seem counter-intuitive, but the rise of Meetup among other similar services has helped take a lot of the hassle out of organising real world events.

A group I’ve joined this year, the Manchester Whisky Club, which runs tastings in a Northern Quarter pub and in members’ homes using Twitter, is a classic example of how those tools and others including Blogger and Paypal can all be harnessed to create a lively community. Even though the main aim is to get drunk and talk about whisky, rather than do something worthy like save the local swimming baths.

The book also touches on Reddit, Mumsnet and some good examples of current hyperlocal news activity in London such as the Brixton Bugle and the evergreen london-se1.co.uk.

You can get the book here. It’s well worth £1.99 of your money.