Monthly Archives: April 2014

What I’m Reading: Nick Bilton’s Hatching Twitter, The Rolling Stones At Altamont, And More

It’s just over seven years since Twitter co-founder Jack Dorsey sent the first tweet, and I’ve just finished reading the most notable book so far on the company’s rise: Hatching Twitter by Nick Bilton of the New York Times.

Bilton’s book is a good read, and has a focus on the battles between Twitter’s various co-founders for control of it. Central is the strife between Dorsey and Ev Williams, and the boardroom coup and counter-coup which has ultimately left Dorsey as its Chairman and Williams on the outside.

It’s easy to forget just how unreliable Twitter was in 2008/09 when the world began to use it in larger numbers: Bilton blames the regular sightings of the Fail Whale on Dorsey’s inexperience as a CEO. At one board meeting, new investors are aghast to learn that Dorsey had neglected to create any kind of backup for Twitter at all.

All the internal struggles left me wondering whether Twitter would have turned out rather differently under a more experienced management team with their eyes more on the ball. After all, it was Twitter users who came up with key aspects of the service such as @-replies and hashtags. Perhaps it’s just as well things went the way they did.

I’ve also been enjoying selections from the excellent Longform App, which picks out the best online long reads and puts them on your tablet for £1.99. I’ve been getting the free weekly emails for quite a while, but there’s something about reading the articles on a tablet which is more enjoyable all round.

Among the recent highlights was this January 1970 piece from Rolling Stone, written by Lester Bangs among others, piecing together the disastrous Rolling Stones free concert at Altamont the previous month. I also enjoyed this vintage profile of Johnny Cash from Playboy magazine, also dating from 1970.

But perhaps best of all was this recent article from Texas Monthly by Michael Hall, on a mysterious triple murder from 1982 – a complicated story which remains unresolved 32 years later despite various convictions. Well worth putting aside an hour of your life to read.

Lecture: Mistakes, Hoaxes And What Journalists Can Learn

Nearly.

Mmm. Nearly.

It was April Fools’ Day on Tuesday, and I gave a lecture to all the first years doing journalism courses at the University of Huddersfield. Appropriately enough it was about hoaxes, or at least some of the more infamous mistakes and errors in media history, and what today’s young journalists can learn from them.

I split it into two parts: the first was on memorable errors from the past, ranging from the newspapers which reported that no lives had been lost on the Titanic to The Times and its infamous Dream Football League story of 2013. The second looked at the challenges posed to journalists by social media, including unsubstantiated rumours and user-generated content of uncertain quality.

Bringing it right up to date, I did a bit on last Sunday’s false rumours circulated widely on Twitter, that Tottenham manager Tim Sherwood had punched a player in the dressing room following the defeat to Liverpool. Those rumours were only scotched when Aaron Lennon tweeted that they were “bollocks” – arguably the first convincing bit of end product the winger has come up with in quite a while.

The presentation is here.